Vapotherm Blog

CAUTION: US Federal law restricts this device to sale by or on the order of a physician. Indications, contraindications, warnings, and instructions for use can be found in the product labelling supplied with each device or at https://vapotherm.com/resources/support/precision-flow-reference/. For spontaneously breathing patients. High Velocity Therapy (HVT) does not provide total ventilatory requirements of the patient. It is not a ventilator. Decisions surrounding patient care depend on the physician’s professional judgment in consideration of all available information for the individual case, including escalation of care depending on patient condition. 

Vapotherm provides high velocity nasal insufflation (HVNI) with simultaneous oxygen delivery to augment breathing of spontaneously breathing patients suffering from respiratory distress and/or hypoxemia in the hospital setting. It is not intended to provide total ventilatory requirements of the patient and not for use during field transport. 
The information provided in this section is for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to support the safety or effectiveness of Vapotherm products, or diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. It is not a substitute for consultation with your healthcare provider and should not be construed as medical advice. 

image of a glass surface with condensation collected on it

Study Compares Rainout Between Two Popular High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) Devices

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the total national healthcare expenditure in 2015 was $3.2 trillion, and 32.3% of that is for hospital care. The cost of healthcare has been steadily increasing and is projected to continue to rise. In 2014 there were 137.8 million emergency department visits, a 14.8% increase since 2006.

Image of clinicians gathered around what appears to be an operating table

High Flow Nasal Cannula as First-Line Therapy in the Emergency Department Setting: a Review of Findings in Six Medical Centers

Since Vapotherm introduced high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in 2000, its applications and utility has increased to include hospital-wide settings and across all age groups. Additionally, there is some evidence that HFNC may help reduce the cost of patient care by limiting ICU admissions.

image of a woman holding a pressure based mask interface in her hand

How to Manage the NiPPV Intolerant Patient

The emergency department (ED) can often be a chaotic and high intensity environment. As an ED clinician, it is helpful and important to quickly troubleshoot any problems that may arise during the care of a patient. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NiPPV) is a commonly utilized tool during the treatment of various cardiac and pulmonary conditions seen in the ED.

graphic of an ambulance

The Role of the Emergency Department Clinician: Preventing Noninvasive Ventilation Intolerance

A call comes in from EMS for a patient being brought to the hospital with the signs and symptoms of respiratory distress, including shortness of breath and chest discomfort. As an emergency department (ED) clinician you begin to quickly take inventory of the different diagnoses for the chief complaint of dyspnea.

image of a neonatal practice dummy with facial adhesives and cannula

How to: Vapotherm Neonatal Cannula Affixation

With the patient in supine position, make sure his/her face is clean.
Use DuoDERM CGF Extra Thin Dressings (1-3/4″ x 1-1/2″).
Peel off the backing of each duoDERM Spot and place them halfway between the patient’s ear and corner of their lip.

Neonatal patient

Vapotherm Shows Similar Efficacy to CPAP/BiLevel in Infants with RDS

Clinicians have historically utilized nCPAP/NIPPV as primary non-invasive therapy. Several randomized controlled trials have…

Researchers Publish Approach to High Flow Nasal Cannula in Neonates

High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is commonly used to support neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), but reports suggest…